PARTICIPANT / Rini Tandon

  • Name Rini Tandon
  • Country Austria
  • Vocation Artist
  • Education Not Available
  • WeblinkWeblink
 
Rini Tandon is an established contemporary visual artist. Rini Tandon was born in 1956. Artists born in the same year and of the same generation are Abilio Febra, Carlos Cosme, Igor Anokhine, Rajeev Lochan, and Girma Agegnehoys Ingeda.

Further Biographical Context for Rini Tandon

Rini Tandon was born in 1956 and was largely influenced creatively by the 1970s growing up. The 1970s were a period of consolidation and growth in the arts, most often characterised as a response to the central strains of the previous decade. Conceptual art emerged as a key movement, and was in part an evolution of and response to minimalism. Land Art took the works of art into the extensive outdoors, taking creative production away from commodities and engaging with the earliest ideas of environmentalism. Process art combined elements of conceptualism with other formal considerations, creating cryptic and experimental bodies of work. Expressive figurative painting began to regain prominence for the first time since the decline of Abstract Expressionism twenty years prior, especially in Germany where Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer, Georg Baselitz became highly renowned figures worldwide. A number of the artists who gained fame and successful in the 1960s remained dominant figures. For example, Andy Warhol branched out into film and magazine publishing, the first type of cross cultural activity for a visual artist. This secured his reputation as a globally renowned celebrity in his own right. New York maintained an prominent position in the international art scene, ensuring that international artists continued to gravitate to the galleries, bars and downtown scene there. International movements began to gain importance included feminism, which translated strongly into the visual culture, and photorealism which had begun in the 1960s and enjoyed momentous commercial and critical success. For the first time painters and sculptors from Latin America were embraced by the leading critical and institutional levers in New York. Towards the end of the decade, the emerging practices of graffiti and street art were beginning to gain attention in the fine art community. Artists including Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat were working in downtown Manhattan and ensuring that spray paint and tagging gained some validity as a fine art practice, a trend which would fully develop and dominate during the following decade. In Japan and Korea, artists associated with the Mono-Ha movement explored on encounters between natural and industrial materials such as stone, glass, cotton, sponge, wood, oil and water, arranging them in mostly unchanged, fleeting states. The works focused on the interdependency of these various elements and the surrounding space, and had a strong focus upon the European philosophy of phenomenology. The largely Italian Arte Povera Movement gained global recognition during the 1970s, with artists like Jannis Kounnelis, Mario Merz, and Michelangelo Pistoletto achieving international praise.

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